More Are Using Mobile Phones to Access Internet

By WEALTH Magazine Staff

Over the past four years, the number of people using mobile phones to access the Internet has quadrupled in the United States and tripled in Western Europe, according to a new report from market research firm Strategy Analytics.

But while lots of people access the Web from their phones, it turns out they still spend much less surfing time on their phones than on their computers. More…

Print Friendly

New iPad Subscription Plan Comes With a Catch

By Mark Andrews

Nothing is more important to the digital future of publishers than the ability to sell subscriptions to iPad- and iPhone-based editions of their periodicals. Now Apple has given them that ability, while imposing a restriction that’s likely to dampen their joy somewhat, Forbes.com reported Tuesday (2/15).

The new service allows publishers (and purveyors of all types of media, in fact) to sell subscriptions both from within the App Store and from outside it. According to Techcrunch, publishers aren’t exactly pleased More…

Print Friendly

Demand Media IPO Raises $1.45 Billion, Stock Spikes

By Mark Andrews

Demand Media—the online-media company famous for paying struggling freelance writers a paltry $15 for a 500-word story—began trading on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday (Jan. 27). The company founded by former MySpace chairman Richard Rosenblatt and private-equity investor Shawn Colo priced its shares at $17, according to an SEC filing. That’s above the $14 to $16 a share range at which the company earlier said it expected to sell its shares and means demand for the stock should be strong, according to a report by paidContent.org, a site that reports on the economics of digital-media content. At $17 a share, Demand Media debuted with a market value of $1.45 billion.

Stock in the company (NYSE: DMD) had a spectacular first day of trading, spiking to $25 at one point before closing Thursday at $21.85. More…

Print Friendly

Nuclear Debate Is Central to Duke-Progress Merger

By WEALTH Magazine Staff

The pending mega-merger between Duke Energy Corp. (NYSE:DUK) and Progress Energy Inc. (NYSE:PGN) will change some basic assumptions about the U.S. power-generation sector. It will create the largest utility in the nation, and that will have an impact on how electricity is generated and transmitted.

For one thing, there is likely to be a renewed move to develop nuclear-energy capacity and to make that a more utility-friendly option. These are the conclusions of Dr. Kent Moors, a 35-year energy-industry insider and editor of the investment More…

Print Friendly

Commodities, Weather, NIKE Hint at Market Trends

By Mark Andrews

 Stocks, as measured by the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index, have been trending gently upward in the last three weeks, including the traditionally slow trading sessions from just before Christmas to New Year’s. This notwithstanding Monday’s (1/10) modest burp.

Commodities were a mixed bag in that period as gold fell, crude oil jumped out to a new two-year high, and the grains rose to a one-year high as well, led by corn. But the new star of the show for commodities is sugar, which stormed out to a new high after word that a cold front had virtually wiped out Florida’s sugar cane crop, which is the largest in the United States. More…

Print Friendly

Apple’s Giant Server Farm Hints at ‘Cloudy’ Ambitions

By Mark Andrews

Apple Inc. has secretly built a massive server farm in Maiden, North Carolina that should come online any day now, if it hasn’t already. The facility is five times larger than Apple’s existing data center in Newark, Calif., writes David Zeiler in the Money Morning e-newsletter.

Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL) has been typically cagey about the purpose of this data center, Zeiler writes, which ultimately could cost as much as $1 billion. Much of Apple’s existing business is based on content delivery, but building a half-million-square-foot facility — among the largest in the world — hints at more grandiose plans, including a major venture into cloud computing. More…

Print Friendly

Will Chinese Inflation Spill Over Into U.S. Economy?

By Mark Andrews

Inflation is beginning to rear its ugly head in what many have warned is an overheated Chinese economy. The Communist government reported that prices rose at an annualized rate of 5.1 percent in November. Chinese officials blamed the surge on food prices, though independent analysts said the country’s fiscal and monetary policies were the cause. But the more important question for U.S.  consumers and investors is whether such price woes will spill across the Pacific to this country. More…

Print Friendly

Extending Jobless Benefits: Good for the Economy?

By Mark Andrews

How you feel about whether Congress should extend unemployment benefits as part of the bill to preserve the Bush-era tax cuts may depend upon which side of the equation you’re on: Are you a jobless person whose benefits are about to expire, or are you a working person whose employer pays into your state’s unemployment insurance program?

Other questions complicate this debate: Do extended jobless benefits make it easier for able-bodied people not to look for work, or do they help stimulate the economy?

Both may be true, according to an analysis in Bloomberg Business. More…

Print Friendly

Crisis Opportunities — Where to Invest in Stricken Real Estate

By Mark Andrews

It’s one of the cruel facts of life that one person’s crisis can create another’s opportunity. And few people know this better than the educated investors who visit this website and read our editorial products at WEALTH magazine. The December issue of International Living magazine is out with a report on five places in the world where local economic calamities have created real bargains for buyers of second homes and other property. More…

Print Friendly

The General Motors IPO — Who Won, Who Lost?

By Mark Andrews

Wall Street went nuts Thursday (11/18) with the initial public offering of GM stock. The new issue traded more than 440 million shares in the NYSE’s regular session, helping to fuel a boost in the Dow of 173 points. So, who made out and who didn’t? Winners are the investment banks and other select few who were allowed in on the IPO; they got a 6 percent return in the day’s first few seconds of trading if they chose to cash in More…

Print Friendly